Neighbourhood Feedback on Traffic Issues & PBW2 Facilitator Job Posting

Durand Traffic Issues – Community Input Required (and meeting on March 6th)

The DNA is seeking input from it’s members on traffic and transportation issues in the neighborhood. We are using Democravise to gather your comments online. Click on the link below and you will see all our neighborhood streets in the tabs at the top of the website. Click on all of these tabs to comment on traffic issues for each street, add an issue no one else has thought of, or up-vote an issue that you think is most important.

To provide feedback please click here.

Public Meeting on Traffic Issues

We will be discussing the traffic and transportation issues Duranders raise and more at our special public meeting on March 6th (City Hall, Room 192 at 7pm) – please RSVP.

Participatory Budget Ward 2 Facilitator Job Posting

PBW2 is looking for a facilitator to help lead and organize the process. Please apply or forward the job posting to your networks. The application deadline is Friday Feb. 21st.

Hamilton Public Bike Share Interactive Feedback Map

In addition to traffic issues, the Durand, along with all downtown and West Hamilton neighbourhoods is getting a Bikeshare system. You can vote for your favorite stations or suggest other locations by going to my.socialcyclist.com or downloading the Social Cyclist app from the apple app store or google play.

2 Responses to Neighbourhood Feedback on Traffic Issues & PBW2 Facilitator Job Posting

  1. The Traffic Survey is being skewed by one or two elitist, entitled individuals who desire return of the horse and buggy. For almost every street they propose adding bike lanes, speed bumps & reductions, and two way traffic. Two way traffic is unsafe for cars and pedestrians. I have ridden a bike for 50 plus years and would never use Queen or Main or other busy streets.
    That’s plain stupid. Speed bumps should be paid for by Duranders Durand must recognize that as important as they are, the rest of Hamilton citizens do need access through the Durand neighbourhood to reach the hospitals, university, businesses, Innovation Centre, and schools. Do not be hijacked by one or two fanatics who want the rest of Hamilton’s citizens obstructed if they decide to travel through the West End.

  2. Re: Mike O’Conner open letter

    Dear Mr. O’Conner,

    You claim “one or two elitist, entitiled individuals” are trying to return the Durand neighbourhood to “the horse and buggy”.
    Who are these individuals, Mr. O’Conner?
    You say they propose adding bike lanes, speed bumps and two way traffic for “almost every street” in the Durand. And obviously “two way traffic is unsafe for cars and pedestrians”.
    Perhaps you would rather have all one-way streets, which are safe for cars but not for pedestrians. You are correct that it would be “plain stupid” to ride your bicycle on Oueen or Main streets. One-way streets can be dangerous.
    I agree that people need to be able to pass through the neighbourhood. But they don’t need to do so at 60 km/h. Removing obstacles to the smooth flow of traffic while slowing the rate of speed should make for approximately the same travel time as now.
    To accuse, and not name, “one or two fanatics” of wanting to obstruct travel through the Durand is an emotional response to an issue that requires much discussion and compromise on all sides.
    The Durand neighbourhood is an antique neighbourhood and designated as of heritage interest. I think, when the opportunities arise, as during reconstruction of sidewalks and streets, a few decorative bricks here and there would help restore a sense of that heritage.
    Perhaps if you lived in the Durand Instead of Westdale you might alter you opinion. If you want to improve traffic flow in your neighbourhood, why not make King S. one-way all the way to McMaster. Oh, right, the residents wouldn’t want that, would they/
    What follows, Mr. O’Conner, if you haven’t already read them, are some of my concerns and suggestions regarding traffic in the Durand.

    Durand Neighbourhood Traffic Concerns
    – Hess St. South

    1. Speeding

    Even outside of rush hour, almost everyone speeds on Hess St.
    South, like they do on Queen St., Herkimer, Charlton and others.
    Too many motorists use the stop sign on Hess at Duke
    St. as the starting line to race up the hill to the Hunter St.
    traffic light.
    Likewise southbound from Duke St. to the Charlton St. signal.

    2. Vehicle noise

    – beginning about 6 a.m. vehicles with noisy, illegal or
    nonexistent mufflers, along with HSR buses, roar as they arrive
    and depart the Hess and Duke intersection
    – during the day, trucks of all kinds use Hess as a thoroughfare

    Suggested solutions for Hess St. South

    – restrict truck tonnage on Hess St. South to seven tonnes,
    unless on local business
    – post “no left turn 7-9 a.m. 4-6 p.m.” at Hess South and
    Herkimer
    _ post “no right turn 7-9 a.m. 4-6 p.m.” at Hess and Charlton
    – creation of, and enforcement of, 40 km/h speed limit
    throughout Durand neighbourhood
    – remove solid yellow line from Hess South
    – remove stop signs on Hess S. between Charlton and Hunter
    – resurface Hess St. from Herkimer to Hunter and install
    traffic calming humps
    – widen sidewalks with larger curbs
    – bump outs, with fence-protected trees from Charlton St. to
    Bold which will eventually obscure the Hunter St. traffic lights
    (while there are leaves) and beautify the street
    – since the entire Durand neighbourhood is already designated as a heritage district, reconstruction designs should reflect the heritage character of the Durand neighbourhood.

    General Suggestions

    – creation and enforcement of city-wide “noisy vehicle” bylaw
    – return Queen St to two-way
    – traffic calming solutions, and heritage design incorporation,
    on Herkimer, between Locke and Queen, and on Charlton from Bay
    to Locke

    Of course, Mr. O’Conner, I don’t expect all, or really any, of my suggestions to become reality but they are food for thought and I look forward to hearing what you bring next to the discussion.

    Rand Kemsley
    175 Hess St. S.
    rkrand@yahoo.ca

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